Aging in the News: May 2022

May 30, 2022
Take a look at how the very concept of retirement is changing across in the country in our news round-up from May 2022.
Photo by Jessica Tezak

They Came, They Hiked, They Stayed: Retirees Lift Fortunes in Rural America

Older adults who retired and relocated are playing an important role in rural communities. As they move to these new cities and towns, they are finding part-time or seasonal work that is helping support local economies. In places like, Tennessee, older adults represent the majority of workers at Dollywood, one of the region’s largest employers and tourist attractions. 

Meanwhile, the National Park Service now rely on older adults to serve as tour guides and help bridge the employment gap. This not only has a positive effect on the personal lives of older adults, but also on the local economy. Since 2010, rural counties have seen an increase in the older adult population which has resulted in increased retail, hospitality, and recreational services. 

“[When older adults] retire, they don’t want to sit around and be idle, so they look for something fun and meaningful to do. It gives them a schedule.’’

Tim Berry, Dollywood’s Vice President for Human Resources

Explore more stories and statistics on older adults moving and working in retirement.


Photo by John Bernier

Millions retired early during the pandemic. Many are now returning to work, new data shows

Retirees are returning to work after leaving at a record pace since the start of the pandemic. Widespread labor shortages have led to employers creating new opportunities for older adults. This tailored support, coupled with inflation and the rising cost of goods, has lured many older adults back to work. 

“This is the first time I’ve seen retirees become a targeted population. It’s very different from what we saw in the last recession, when older workers faced extreme discrimination in the labor market in a way that they never quite recovered from.” 

Amanda Cage, Chief Executive of the National Fund for Workforce Solutions

Some states report more than 1.5 million retirement-age adults have re-entered the workforce. But more research is needed to determine how many workers retired versus those who were “forced” out and more information is needed about the types of jobs they are filling.


Photo by Georgia McManus

‘I needed something to do’: How working in retirement is being embraced by older adults and companies

Many older adults are choosing to work long past the previously established retirement age while others are being lured back to work. Citing a report from AARP, MarketWatch outlines the growing number of employers that have designated themselves as “age-friendly” work environments to attract older workers. With 11.3 million job openings across the country, employers are in need of more experienced workers. 

“That older cohort of workers is bringing a lot of creative energy and a lot of skill and a lot of expertise to the table. And so, it makes sense to keep that expertise as long as we can.”


Photo by Andrea Piacquadio

Should You Undo Your Retirement and Go Back to Work? These Questions Might Give You the Answer

As this phenomenon of older adults returning to the workforce continues to play out across the country, the Wall Street Journal created a helpful resource for older adults contemplating a return. It includes valuable questions older adults can ask themselves about new work opportunities to determine if they are ready to get back into the job market. 

“New retirees sometimes make a similar discovery about their own happiness. Some people realize that days filled with leisure time aren’t ideal, after all. They miss the routine and camaraderie of work. So if you thought someone like you would be more satisfied in California, you should take extra care to update your retirement plans based on what actually makes you happy.”

Share with friends and family

Related Conversations

Explore our news round-up from August 2022 where we examine stories about older adults and aging in America. 
Several economic factors have led more older adults to make a return to the workforce or contemplate a return. Some are looking to pad their retirement, others want to support their families, while others are looking for a way to stay connected and active in this new stage of life.

Stay informed on the latest updates